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Genealogy for
Elizabeth  English 

 Parents 
Click for more Information about James English.
James English
1770 - 1870

Mary Nicey May Unknown (English)
1770 - 1870
Click for more Information about Mary Unknown (English).


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About Elizabeth English
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Elizabeth English
1798 - 12/25/1888
(Shown at age 87)
Elizabeth English was born about 1798 in a town near the Okmulgee River, Georgia and died on December 25, 1888 in Dale County, Alabama. Actual date of birth is unknown. She lived to be about 91 years old.

She was Creek Indian. Elizabeth's Creek name was Nvhokv and pronounced (Nahoga / Nuh-ho-quh). She is listed on the Eastern Creek rolls as number #11147. Some of her descendants were told she belonged to the Harjo-Boggas parrot band of Creek Indians, however, this has not been proven.

One story passed down to her great, great, grand-children says Elizabeth was separated from her people as a very young child during an annual, multi-village fishing event. When she was discovered alone in the woods by whites, she was taken in and raised by the English family. She married a half-Indian and the town where she lived named a special day after her.

When the Civil War begins in 1861, all six of her sons enlist in the Confederate Army.
Records
Census6/1/1816 AL (Monroe County) 18 yrs old 
On line 6, Mahala Ward is shown living in a house with 4 women of color and 7 slaves. There are no whites living with her.
Next door on line 5, is her brother Sam Moniac

Further down the same census page her son, Benjamin Ward is listed. His household consists of one white male over 20 years old, one white male under 20 years old, and one female over 20 - a total of 3 inhabitants. 
Other2/24/1837 GA (Decatur County) 39 yrs old 
James M. Baker and Nicy English appoint James Ward of Dale County Alabama, to sell/administer their share of the estate of James English. The estate was drawn up as Lot #155 (202.5 acres) in the 19th District of Early County GA (which became Decatur County in 1832). The actual language of the document says "convey our share or proportion being, one half part as the heirs of James English deceased". This could be interpeted to mean James Baker and Nicy English each own 1/2 of the estate -- which would mean they are the only two survivors. Or, it could mean the two of them together own 1/2 of the estate and someone else owns the other half of the estate. 
Other11/18/1837 GA (Decatur County) 39 yrs old 
John Rodgers pays $100 for Lot #155 owned by James English. James and Elizabeth Ward, orphan and heirs of James English, acknowledge this sale as being completed.  
Census10/24/1850 AL (Dale County) 52 yrs old 
family#145: James B. Ward (age 54, farmer, born in SC), Elizabeth (age 52, born in GA), William J. (20, farmer, born in AL), Benjamin F. (16, farmer, AL), Elizabeth (14, AL), Mary (12, AL), Monroe (5, AL), Ann Elliott (12, race is recorded as "b" [choices were white, black or Indian], born in AL). 
Census8/31/1860 AL (Dale County) 62 yrs old 
Family #1227: James B. Ward (age 65), Elizabeth (age 60), Monroe (male, age 15), Ann Ellis (black female, age 21), Wesly (mulatto male, age 6), Henry (black male, age 3), Amos (black male, 8 months old). James B. is a farmer and Monroe is a student. James estimates the value of his real estate to be 2,000 and his personal estate to be $4,973. James B. was born in SC, Elizabeth in GA and Monroe in AL.  
Other8/28/1861 The Monroe Letter AL (Dale County) 63 yrs old 
The 'Monroe Letter'. A copy of the original statement made by James B. Ward to his son (and signed by L. S.) saying he is half Indian and his wife, Elizabeth, is a full-blood Creek Indian. 
Census8/25/1870 AL (Geneva County) 72 yrs old 
First recorded as house #3 and then renumbered to #385, family #5, then 390: Monroe Ward (age 25), Mary (age 24), Elizabeth (age 3), Joe E. (age 2), Elizabeth Ward (age 71) and Russell Jane Ward (age 68). Monroe says his occupation as farmer and estimates the value of his real estate to be $320 and his personal estate to be $591. All were born in AL except Russell Jane who was born in GA. Mary, Elizabeth and Russel Jane cannot read or write. 
Additional information about Geneva County, AL around 1870: Geneva County was created two years prior to this census on December 26, 1868 from Coffee, Dale, and Henry Counties. It is located near the Choctawhatchee River.. The Freedmen's Bureau, formed after the Civil War, managed this land until they were abolished in 1868 by the US Congress. They were committed to the supervision and management of all abandoned lands and the control of all subjects relating to refugees and freedmen. Members of this group harassed settlers by taking bribes and acquired lands they were to protect during the time leading up to their disbandment. Click here to see a map from this timeperiod.  
Census1/1/1873 GA (Decatur County) 75 yrs old 
FRIENDLY CREEKS of DECATUR GEORGIA: Copy of hand-written census of Friendly Indians living in Decatur County, GA. Elizabeth Ward, James Ward and Joe Ward are listed near the bottom and William Ward is the first person listed. A copy of this was given to us but the date was not provided. We are in the process of obtaining date, etc. info. (NOTE: We have located references saying it was dated 1873, but these are 3rd hand. Actual date of this document still needs to be confirmed.) 
Graveyard/Tombstone12/25/1888 near Malvern AL (Geneva County) 91 yrs old 
Elizabeth Ward 1798 - 12/25/1888 - Purvis Cemetery. (Old Indian Cem.) on Hwy 49 & CR70 north of Malvern. 
Other11/12/1955 FL (Bay County) 67 yrs after death 
Sarah Emma Ward Heridix says that she is 87 years of age and personally knew Elizabeth English Ward, wife of James B. Ward. Elizabeth English Ward was a Creek Indian. She says on oath that she is personally acquainted with Jesse Joe Ward of Bruce in Walton County, Florida, and she personally knows that Jesse Joe Ward is the grandson of Elizabeth English Ward.
She further says she is acquainted with Elizabeth Rebecca Ward of Freeport, Florida, in Walton County and Lyda Apseybeth Ward Hayes of Pensacola, Florida, in Escambia County. Elizabeth Rebecca Ward and Lyda Apseybeth Ward Hayes are the sisters of Jesse Joe Ward, and all of the above named are the grandchildren of Elizabeth English Ward. 
Other11/17/1955 FL  67 yrs after death 
C.A. Faulk says he is 85 years old and personally knows Elizabeth English Ward, wife of James B. Ward. Elizabeth English Ward was a Creek Indian. He was personally acquainted with Jesse Joe Ward of Bruce in Walton County, Fl. He also knows Jesse Joe Ward is the grandson of Elizabeth English Ward.
He further says he is acquainted with Elizabeth Rebecca Ward of Freeport, FL, in Walton County and Lyda Apseybeth Ward Hayes of Pensacola, FL, Escambia County. Elizabeth Rebecca Ward and Lyda Apseybeth Ward Hayes are the sisters of Jesse Joe Ward. All of them are grandchildren of Elizabeth English Ward.  
Other12/10/1955 AL  67 yrs after death 
Allice Thomley says she knew John Jackson Ward to the be the son of James B. (Jim Bear) Ward and Elizabeth (English) Ward. She knew the family of John Jackson Ward and his wife, Susan Wynn Ward. She knows their children were Elizabeth (Purvis), Katherin (Kate Byrd), Nettie (Skipper), Sallie (Wright), Rebecca, Ellen (Singletary), Liza (Bonds), Teresy (Horn), Mary Jane (Skipper), John, Joe, Jeff, Jasper, Franklin Jackson (Frank), and Sterling. 
Other12/28/1955 AL  67 yrs after death 
E.A. Eddie Alonzo Hundley says he was personally acquainted with James B. Ward and Elizabeth English Ward (now deceased). He knows Elizabeth English Ward [page wrinkled and text missing from copy] Creek Indian. All that knew her, knew her to be a Creek Indian. He also says that he is 92 years old and not related to James B. Ward or his wife Elizabeth.  
Other12/31/1955 FL (Walton County) 67 yrs after death 
Jesse Joe Ward, who after being duly sworn says that he is 85 years of age, a grandson of James B. Ward and Elizabeth English Ward, the Creek Indian, and that their sons were John Jackson Ward, Thomas Jefferson Ward, James Madison Ward, Benjamin Franklin Ward, William Joe Ward and Monroe Ward.  
Other1/14/1956 FL (Geneva County) 68 yrs after death 
Charoles O. Silcox knew John J. Ward who is known as John Jackson Ward and he knew his wife, Susan Ward He also knows that they lived together for many years in Geneva County, Alabama as husband and wife and they had fifteen children who lived to be of age and their names are as follows:
Mary J. Ward, James J. Ward, Susan E. Ward, Nancy E. Ward, William J. Ward, Tiercy E. Ward, Louisa F. Ward, Franklin J. Ward, Thomas J. Ward, Rebecca A. Ward, Sarah M. Ward, Rody Ward, Sterling Ward and Annette Ward, and John J. Ward.
He knows that John J. Ward was known as the oldest son of James B. Ward and his wife Elizabeth English Ward and that Elizabeth English Ward was a full-blooded Creek Indian. He knows John J. Ward or John Jackson Ward was a half Indian and the son of the Full-blooded Indian and was recognized by all of the people of the Community as being that. Of his own personal knowledge, he knows Elizabeth English Ward as a full-blooded Creek Indian. He also says he will be ninety years of age February 22, 1956 and he is not related by blood or marriage to James B. Ward and Elizabeth English Ward. 
Other2/29/1956 AL (Geneva County) 68 yrs after death 
Susan Davis Martin of Gevena County, Alabama, says she is 86 years of age. The attached two photographs are true pictures of her mother, Mary Ward Davis, the daughter of Elizabeth English Ward the Creek Indian and James B. Ward. She has had these pictures in her possession since the death of her mother Mary Ward Davis and she knows they are true pictures of her. 
Other12/28/1956 AL  68 yrs after death 
Thomas Henry Peel, of Geneva County, Slocomb, Alabama, says he is 86 years old. He knew Elizabeth English Ward, widow of James B. Ward, and her two sons, John Jackson and Monroe Ward and her daughter, Mary Ward, who married James W. Davis. Elizabeth English Ward lived with her daughter, Mary Ward Davis in her later years and died there. He knew Elizabeth English Ward for several years and she was known by all to be a full blooded Creek Indian. James W. Davis was my nearest neighbor, lived only two miles away. He is not related by blood or marriage to Elizabeth English Ward or any of her descendants. Nor is he related by blood or marriage to any of the Davis family. 
Other3/12/1957 AL  69 yrs after death 
Mrs. Alice Thomley, age 98, says she knew John J. Ward (also known as John Jackson Ward) and she knew his wife, Susan Ward. They lived together for many years in Geneva County, AL. As husband and wife they had fifteen children who lived to be of age. Their names were: Mary J. Ward, James J. Ward, Susan E. Ward, Nancy E. Ward, William J. Ward, Tiercy E. Ward, Louisa F. Ward, Franklin J. Ward, Thomas J. Ward, Rebecca A. Ward, Sarah H. Ward, Rody Ward, Sterling Ward, Annette Ward and John J. Ward.
She knew John J. Ward was the oldest son of James B. Ward and his wife Elizabeth English Ward and that Elizabeth English was a full-blooded Creek Indian. She knew John J. Ward (or John Jackson Ward) was half-Indian and the son of the full-blooded Indian and was recognized by all in the community to be that. She further says she is not related to Elizabeth English or any of her descendants. 

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Click on any of the News, Events, or Discoveries buttons above to see historical things that happened during Elizabeth English's life. These are only some of the major events that affected the life and times of Elizabeth, her family, and friends. For example, Elizabeth is 5 years old when Louisiana Purchase from France (who secured it from Spain) gives the US a huge new territory and the port of New Orleans.
AgeDateEvent
4 1802 Georgia formally cedes western claims for its southern boundary at the 31st parallel -- which will become the north western border of FL and southern border of AL.
5 1803 Between 1803 and 1811 a horse trail is established connecting Milledgeville, Georgia to Fort Stoddert, American outpost north of Mobile. This is expanded into a road and called The Federal Road by 1811.
7 1805 Indian cessions opened up large portions of western (Choctaw) and northern (Chickasaw and Cherokee) Alabama to white settlers.
13 1811 Tecumseh visits the Creek Indians living in what will become Georgia and Alabama to try to persuade them to join his fight against the flood of white settlers. Some towns join forces with Tecumseh and become known as "Red Sticks".
14 1812 The Creek tribes in southern Alabama and Georgia find themselves under increasing pressure from white settlers. Led by Chief Weatherford, they accepted an alliance with Tecumseh and are nicknamed "Red Sticks".
15 1813 During 1813-14, Muskogee-speaking Creeks leave AL and move into areas in Northern FL in response to the Creek Civil War (also known as the Red-sticks War).
15 1813 Two battles begin the Creek Indian War: (1) Fort Mims Massacre - Fort Mims is attacked on August 13 by the Red Sticks while the inhabitants are eating their noon meal. The massacre brings an immediate response from the whites and soldiers are recruited from Tennessee, Georgia and other territories, and (2) The Battle of Holy Ground on December 1813.
16 1814 The Treaty of Fort Jackson is finalized on August 9, 1814. William Weatherford (Red Eagle) surrenders to Gen. Andrew Jackson and cede their lands to the federal government. This opens approximately half of present-day AL to white settlement.
16 1814 Battle at Horseshoe Bend on March 27, leaves the Creek Red Sticks scattered and unorganized. Those that survive the battle flee south into northern Florida and band together as the Seminoles. Red Eagle (Billy Weatherford) surrenders to General Andrew Jackson at Fort Jackson later in the year.
19 1817 Alabama Territory is created when Congress passes an act to divide the Mississippi Territory and admit it into the union as a state. Alabama will remain a territory for two more years.
21 1819 Alabama admitted to the United States
37 1835 Alabama gold rush begins in the east-centrl hill country.
39 1837 The Second Creek war begins in 1836. In 1837 The Battle of Hobdy's Bridge becomes the last indian battle in AL.
42 1840 Alabama reports a total population of 590,756 on the 1940 Federal Census. This includes 335,185 whites, 255,571 blacks, 253,532 slaves, zero Native Americans, and others.
52 1850 State population=771,623. The 1850 Federal Census reveals the White population=426,514; African-American population=345,109; Slave population=342,844; Free black population=2,265; Urban population=35,179; Rural population=736,444; Cotton production in bales=564,429; Corn production in bushels=28,754,048; Number of manufacturing establishments=1,026.
AgeDateEvent
3 1801 Clarke and Tatnall Counties formed.
4 1802 Georgia formally cedes western claims for its southern boundary at the 31st parallel -- which will become a border between,GA, FL and AL. GA's western border reaches to the Mississippi River.
5 1803 Between 1803 and 1811 a horse trail is established connecting Milledgeville, Georgia to Fort Stoddert, American outpost north of Mobile. This is expanded into a road and called The Federal Road by 1811.
9 1807 December 10 - Jasper, Jones, Laurens, Morgan, Putnam, and Telfair Counties formed.
10 1808 Pulaski County created.
11 1809 Twiggs County formed.
13 1811 Tecumseh visits the Creek Indians living in what will become Georgia and Alabama to try to persuade them to join his fight against the flood of white settlers. Some towns join forces with Tecumseh and become known as "Red Sticks".
13 1811 Madison County created.
14 1812 The Creek tribes in southern Alabama and Georgia find themselves under increasing pressure from white settlers. Led by Chief Weatherford, they accepted an alliance with Tecumseh and are nicknamed "Red Sticks".
14 1812 Emanual County formed.
15 1813 During 1813-14, Muskogee-speaking Creeks leave GA and move into areas in Northern FL in response to the Creek Civil War (also known as the Red-sticks War).
19 1817 First Seminole war begins as Georgia backwoodsmen attack Indians just north of the Florida border. !817-1818. General Andrew Jackson invades the area.
21 1819 Rabun County formed.
22 1820 December 20 - Campbell and Randolph Counties formed.
23 1821 May 15 - Dooly, Fayette, Henry, Houston, Monroe and Newton Counties formed.
24 1822 December 9 - Bibb, Dekalb and Pike Counties formed.
25 1823 December 8 - Decatur County formed.
26 1824 December 15 - Upson and Ware Counties formed.
27 1825 Baker, Lowndes, Thomas, Butts and Taliaferro Counties formed.
28 1826 January 24 - Treaty of Washington abrogates Treaty of Indian Springs. The Creeks cede a smaller area and are allowed to remain on their lands until January 1, 1826.
29 1827 December 14, - Harris, Marion, Meriwether and Talbot.
32 1830 Cherokee, Heard, and Stewrt Counties are formed.
33 1831 Sumter County is formed.
34 1832 December 3 - Bartow, Cobb, Crawford, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union Counties formed.
35 1833 Walker County is formed.
38 1836 Seminoles massacre Major Francis L. Dade and his 103 man command. This starts the second Seminole War. February - Battle of Hitchity. March 27 - Colonel J.W. Fannin and his Georgian's executed by order of Santa Ana at Goliad on Palm Sunday. July - Battle of Brushy Creek. July 3 - Battle of Chickasawachee Swamp. July 27 - Battle of Echowanochaway Creek.
39 1837 Mcon and Dade Counties are formed.
40 1838 Chattooga County formed
49 1847 Atlanta, Georgia is incorporated. Formally Marthasville
52 1850 Gordon and Clinch Counties are formed.
53 1851 Clay, Howell, Polk, Spalding, and Whitfield Counties are formed.
54 1852 Taylor County formed.
55 1853 Catoosa, Pickens, Hart, Dougherty, Webster, Flton, and Worth Counties aare creaated.
56 1854 Fannin, Coffee, Chattahooche, Charlton, and Calhoun Counties formed.
58 1856 Haralson, Terrell, Berrien, Colquit, Miller, and Towns Counties formed.
59 1857 Dawson, Milton, Pierce, Glascock, Mitchell, Schley, White, and Wilcox Counties formed.
60 1858 Clayton, Quitman, Banks, Brooks, Johnson, and Echols Counties formed.
72 1870 Douglas, McDuffie, Rockdale, and Dodge Counties formed.
77 1875 Oconee County formed.
AgeDateEvent
1 1799 The Rosetta Stone was discovered
2 1800 The first battery was invented by Volta
9 1807 The first steamboat was invented by Fulton
16 1814 The first locomotive engine was created by Stephenson
32 1830 The first railroad is constructed between Liverpool and Manchester, England
41 1839 Goodyear invents vulcanized rubber, opening the door for tires and other rubber products.
46 1844 The first telegraph message is sent by Morse, who later invents the Mores Code
55 1853 The process of creating steel is invented by Besermer in Britain and Kelly in the U.S.
58 1856 The first Neanderthal fossils are found near Germany
61 1859 Charles Darwin publishes "Origin of Species" and begins the evolution theory.
67 1865 Mendel publishes his papers on genetics and introduces the concept to the public.
71 1869 Cro-magnon Man fossils are found in France
79 1877 Edison invents the phonograph permitting music and voices to be recorded and replayed.
81 1879 Edison invents the electric light bulb.
AgeDateEvent
2 1800 NEWS HEADLINES: Seat of U.S. government moves from Philadelphia to Washington DC
13 1811 NEWS HEADLINES: Tecumseh's emerging Indian Confederacy is defeated at the Battle of Tippecanoe in Ohio. Afterwards, Tecumseh and his brother travel from their Shawnee homes in the north to recruit and unify the southern Indians.
14 1812 NEWS HEADLINES: War of 1812 begins and will continue for until 1814. Some call it the Second War of Independence because the US fights Great Britain to a stalemate, Americas independence was assured.
30 1828 Gold is discovered in Georgia.
36 1834 July 9 - The S.S. John Randolph, the first successful iron steamship, is launched in Savannah
63 1861 NEWS HEADLINES: American Civil war begins at Ft. Sumter, located in Charleston Harbor, VA.
64 1862 NEWS HEADLINES: May 20, 1862 the US government passes the Homestead Act to provide cheap land for settlement of lower Southeast and West.
84 1882 NEWS HEADLINES: Edison creates the first large power station in New York City, making it the first place in America to have electricity.
87 1885 NEWS HEADLINES: Eastman invents the box camera. For the first time photography becomes affordable for the average citizen.
AgeDateEvent
5 1803 Louisiana Purchase from France (who secured it from Spain) gives the US a huge new territory and the port of New Orleans.
6 1804 The Seminole warrior later known as Osceola is born near Tuskegee, AL.
7 1805 Federal Road project begins after the Creek Indians give the U.S. permission to develop a “horse path” through their nation that will provide better mail delivery between Washington City (DC) and New Orleans. Soon settlers are traveling and settling along this path to settle the southern frontier.
8 1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition, which began in 1804, ends. News of the rich lands to the west begins to spread.
13 1811 By 1811 the new "Federal Road" (which started as a horse path) is filled with a steady flow of white settlers into Creek Indian Territories. The Spanish begin to fan hostile sentiments among the Indians.
22 1820 The Act of April 24, 1820 abolished the land purchase credit system, fixed the price of public lands at $1.25 per acre, and set the minimum purchase at 80 acres. After a person purchased land, a final certificate was issued by the land office and sent to Washington DC to be verified and signed by the President -- a time consuming process. Public lands were most typically available through US treaties with Indians who agreed to be removed from their homelands.
32 1830 Indian Removal Act signed and the moving of eastern Indians west of the Mississippi begins.
37 1835 Second Seminole Indian War begins.
39 1837 The trickery used to capture Seminole Indian Chief Osceola (Assi Yohola) creates a public uproar and U.S. General Jesup is publicly condemned.
42 1840 Oregon Trail is established
44 1842 Second Seminole Indian War ends and thousands of Seminole Indians are forced to move west of the Mississippi.
57 1855 Third Seminole Indian War begins. It ends three years later when Chief Billy Bowlegs and his band are forced to move from Florida.
62 1860 Presidential election puts Abraham Lincoln in office. The campaign has heated the issues regarding slavery in the south.
64 1862 May 20, 1862 the US government passes the Homestead Act to provide cheap land for settlement of lower Southeast and West.
65 1863 Abraham Lincoln issues the "Emancipation Proclamation" freeing slaves.
67 1865 American Civil war ends with General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, VA. Reconstruction begins in the "old South"
70 1868 An eight-hour work day is established for federal employees.
77 1875 Tennessee enacts Jim Crow law.
78 1876 The National League of Baseball is founded
AgeDateEvent
35 1833 Santa Anna is elected President of Mexico
Family Snapshots
Elizabeth
Elizabeth
Grave of Elizabeth
Grave of Elizabeth


Marriages
James Ward
Born about 1796 and died about 1861.
They were married 1/1/1814.

Click for more information about James Ward.


The Children of Elizabeth English

James Madison Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama on June 30, 1823 and died in Bruce, Florida on February 3, 1891. He was 67 years old.

He served in the 33rd Alabama Infantry CSA which was organized in Pensacola, FL in April 1862. They fought battles in AL, TN, GA and the Carolinas. The 33rd disbanded before the official surrender a...
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Thomas Jefferson Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama on June 8, 1825 and died in Bruce, Florida on July 1, 1919. He was 94 years old.

He and his family moved to Florida between 1862 and 1866. He served in the Confederate Army. It says Pvt Co F 6 Ala Inf CSA on his tombstone.

Children:
  1. Mary Jane (1848, Dale C...
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John Jackson Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama on February 16, 1827 and died in Malvern, Geneva Co., Alabama on August 12, 1901. He was 74 years old.

Married 1843 to Susan Elizabeth Wynn (born 2/23/1825 in GA died 12/6/1896 in AL). Children:
  1. James J. (1846),
  2. John J. Jr. (1850),
  3. William Josiah (1853 -1908),
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40 years old
William Josiah Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama on March 23, 1830 and died in Bruce, Florida on April 4, 1924. He was 94 years old.

He was called Diamond Joe, because he made a diamond shape mark on all his possessions. He could recite most of the Bible by memory. He built a log school house on Seven Run Creek near Bruce, FL.
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76 years old
Benjamin Franklin Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama about 1834 and died in Ponce De Leon (Holmes Co. ), Florida on June 23, 1923. He was about 89 years old.

Married Martha Edna Gilley (born 4/28/1838 in Alabama and died 1/16/1913). Children:
  1. Jesse E. (1858-1942),
  2. Jincy F. (1860-),
  3. James W.(1862-1948),
  4. Martha L.(...
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Elizabeth Rebecca Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama about 1836 and died in an unknown location about 1920. She was about 84 years old.

Believed to have been the second wife of Rufus Jackson Purvis (11/15/1824-1913) born in GA and died in AL. Marriage was in Dale, AL. He was the son of Chelsey Purvis (1800, Dooly GA - 1866, Genev...
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76 years old
Mary Jane Ward
Born in Geneva County, Alabama on March 26, 1838 and died in Geneva County, Alabama on March 21, 1921. She was 83 years old.

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Monroe James Ward
Born in Dale County, Alabama on April 7, 1845 and died in Walton County, Florida on June 7, 1907. He was 62 years old.

Military service: Pvt Co. D 53 Ala Inf CSA. He married Mary Elizabeth 'Polly' Russell (3/15/1844 AL - 4/23/1912 FL).

Children:
  1. William D. (1870),
  2. Benjamin F.,
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